Exhibition - Revelations: Experiments in Photography

Exhibition -  Revelations: Experiments in Photography

Revelations: Experiments in Photography – The Science Museum, London, from 20th of March 2015 to 13th of September 2015

The last chance to see a thought-provoking exhibition at The Science Museum, which makes us look at the photography from a different perspective. The exhibition encourages us to discover the influence of early scientific photography on modern and contemporary art. It explores the how the early images taken by scientists and the techniques that they used shaped the history of photography and the modern art.  

This is a scan of the 1883 photo of the Orion Nebula made by Andrew Ainslie Common By Andrew Ainslie Common (1841-1903) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons  

This is a scan of the 1883 photo of the Orion Nebula made by Andrew Ainslie Common
By Andrew Ainslie Common (1841-1903) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
 

The exhibition is divided into three parts. The first part features some of the earliest photographic experiments and attempts to record the phenomena of nature in the XIX century. Among them you will find the pioneering attempts of photographing the Moon, Sun and other sky objects (for example by Pierre Jules César Janssen or Andrew Ainslie Common), some of the first photographs taken using the microscope (William Henry Fox Talbot) and X-Ray photography by Josef Maria Eder.

Frosche in Bauch und Ruckenlage' (Frog on Back and Front) 1896, Josef Maria Eder (1855-1945); X-ray Collection of National Media Museum, National Media Museum @ Flickr Commons

Frosche in Bauch und Ruckenlage' (Frog on Back and Front) 1896, Josef Maria Eder (1855-1945); X-ray

Collection of National Media Museum,

National Media Museum @ Flickr Commons

The second part of the exhibition focuses on the ways in which early scientific photography influenced the work of the modernists. It showcases less known works of such artists like Laure Albin Guillot (her “micrography”: turning microscopic images into visual arts), László Moholy-Nagy (his futuristic X-Ray photography), Man Ray, Berenice Abbott (her photographs used in science books), Harold Eugene Edgerton (who photographed the bullet in flight), and others.

The third and final part explores the relations between the early scientific photography and the contemporary art. It features works of such artists like Joris Jansen (series “Kosmos”), Ori Gersht (the series “Blow Up”), Hiroshi Sugimoto (series “Lightning Fields”) or Trevor Paglen (series “Limited Telephotography”) among others.

If you miss Revelations in London, then from 19 November 2015 to 7 February 2016 the exhibition will go on show at the National Media Museum in Bradford.

For more information about the exhibition and to book tickets, visit Science Museum website here.